Organizing the web efficiently


Information is everywhere. On a given day, the amount of new information and content that is created is beyond our comprehension. The number is constantly moving at a rate like no other in time. This is what is known as “infowhelm”.

At one point in time, all of the information that was deemed credible and academically vetted was found in a library. Libraries are vast collections of information primarily in bound, paper format. In order to get your ideas bound, you had to go through a publishing process and have your work vetted by a panel of editors or academics that deemed your work, your conclusions, appropriate for publication. While the publishing process is still in tact, the outlets for “publication” – depending on what your definition of publication is – have increased exponentially.

In 1993, Encarta published the first Encyclopedia on a digital disc. This seemingly small event sparked the transition to digital formats and ushered in a new era of information acquisition. Since this time, the library and publishing industry have changed dramatically. So much so, that in 2009, the Encarta Encyclopedia was discontinued in favor of the crowdsourced encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

So how do we find what we’re looking for and know that it is credible? How can we be so sure of information credibility when it is being published faster than it can be processed or vetted for credibility. How do we stay informed and know what we’re being fed is credible.

This is the world we live in; the world of infowhelm.

Below are two videos detailing infowhelm and conversely, the dangers of filtering the web .Watch each piece and provide a response in the form of a blog post. Please cover each video in your post and compare and contrast the two messages.

How do we find a middle ground?

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About Andy Marcinek

Instructional Technologist at Burlington High School
This entry was posted in 12.RIT.1, 12.SL.3, 12.SL.4, 12.W.10, 12.W.6, 12.W.7, 12.W.8, 12.W.9. Bookmark the permalink.

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